White Chocolate

Easy Chocolate Cake

White Chocolate


White Chocolate ~ Easy Chocolate Cake
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Easy Chocolate Cake

Easy Chocolate Cake

White Chocolate

White Chocolate is technically not Chocolate at all, since it does not contain Chocolate Liquor or Cocoa solids, the two primary ingredients in Chocolate. It does, however, contain cocoa butter, which is a product of the Cacao plant, and it has a delicate Flavor in which hints of Chocolate certainly play a role. It is processed and made much like Chocolate, and White Chocolate can also be used just as regular Chocolate is in an assortment of foods.

To Make Chocolate, the seeds of the cacao plant are harvested and allowed to ferment slightly. The outer casing of the seeds is cracked, revealing an inner core which is ground into Chocolate Liquor. This substance is the base of most Chocolates, but it can also be separated to yield cocoa solids and cocoa butter. Cocoa butter is the fat of the Chocolate, and it is rich, creamy, and very stable when processed well. Cocoa solids are mixed in with more Chocolate Liquor for intense Chocolates, or sold separately. Cocoa butter can be processed to make a variety of products, including cosmetic creams.

When White Chocolate is made, the separated cocoa butter is mixed with milk and a sweetener. White Chocolate is also frequently flavored with Vanilla. The mixture is poured into molds which take a variety of forms from Chocolate Bars to baking blocks, and packaged for sale after it solidifies and cools. The resulting white chocolate has an ivory color and a creamy flavor. It is also a very fragile Chocolate, and needs to be handled with care in baking.

Several nations have established labeling standards for White Chocolate, to ensure that it contains cocoa butter, rather than vegetable oil or another fat. As a general rule, White Chocolate must contain 20% cocoa butter. High quality White Chocolate made with good ingredients will have a cream to ivory color, whereas White Chocolate made with substitute fats will be truly white. This type of White Chocolate has an inferior flavor and texture, and most consumers and confectioners avoid it.

The delicate flavor of White Chocolate can be used in a number of desserts, or blended with conventional Chocolate for a contrast. It can also be used in savory dishes, especially spicy foods, which interact delightfully with the sweet, creamy flavor. White Chocolate is also available in plain bars which can be enjoyed plain, although it tends to be very rich, so it should not be consumed in large amounts.



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Chocolate Liquor

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Chocolate Liquor


Chocolate Liquor ~ Easy Chocolate Cake
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Easy Chocolate Cake

Easy Chocolate Cake

Chocolate Liquor

Chocolate Liquor is a combination of cocoa solids and cocoa butter which is obtained when Cacao beans are processed to Make Chocolate products. Once Chocolate Makers have produced Chocolate Liquor, there are a number of ways in which the substance can be handled to make various Chocolate products ranging from Cocoa to baking chocolate. As a general rule, Chocolate Liquor is created in the factories of Chocolate producers, allowing the companies to have control over the composition of their Chocolate, although smaller Chocolate Makers may order Chocolate Liquor and other products from bigger companies to bypass the expensive and time-consuming process of Making Chocolate from scratch.

Getting to Chocolate Liquor requires several stages. To begin with, the large pods of the Theobroma cacao tree must be harvested, split to expose the beans, and allowed to ferment, taking some of the bitterness out of the beans inside. Once the beans have fermented, they must be roasted and cracked to remove the hulls, leaving behind the cacao nibs. These nibs are then ground to produce Chocolate Liquor.

Chocolate Liquor turns liquid because the grinding process Melts the rich cocoa butter inside the nibs. As the nibs are ground, they break apart into a gritty, runny paste. While the paste smells like Chocolate and even looks like it, it wouldn't be very appetizing, because it is unsweetened and the grainy texture is not very enjoyable.

After a factory has produced Chocolate Liquor, it is pressed to form what is imaginatively known as press cake. During the pressing process, the cocoa butter runs out of the Chocolate Liquor, leaving behind the cocoa solids. The separated components of the Chocolate can be blended back together in varying amounts and conched with ingredients like sugar, milk, and spices to make bar chocolate, or they may be processed individually to make things like cocoa and White Chocolate.

Processing Chocolate Liquor requires care and precision. Nibs from different parts of the world have distinctly different Flavors, so Chocolate producers must think carefully about the blend they want to produce. The beans are typically blended during the roasting process, but they must be inspected carefully before being submitted to grinding to make sure that they adhere to the producer's standards. Improperly fermented or roasted beans can ruin a batch of Chocolate, and given the high cost of this coveted ingredient, this is not desirable.



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Chocolate

Easy Chocolate Cake

Chocolate


Chocolate ~ Easy Chocolate Cake
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Easy Chocolate Cake

Easy Chocolate Cake

Chocolate

Chocolate is a confection made from Cacao beans, the seeds of the cacao plant. There are a large number of Chocolate products on the market, from Powdered Cocoa for making drinks to White Chocolate, and most markets carry a cross-section of Chocolate confections for their customers. In addition to being available at general markets and grocery Stores, Chocolate can also be purchased from specialty companies which make luxury Chocolate and distinctive Chocolate confections.

Making Chocolate is a time consuming process. Cacao plants are grown on plantations in South America, where the plant is native, and in parts of Africa. There are actually several varieties of cacao plant, all of which produce Chocolates with slightly different Flavors, and the flavor is also impacted by where the Chocolate is grown, how it is handled after harvest, and how it is processed. Chocolate companies invest a great deal of money in developing ideal blends of cacao beans to create the flavors their consumers are used to.

Cacao beans grow in large pods which are harvested once they ripen and then allowed to ferment. Initially, the cacao beans are extremely bitter; the fermentation process softens the bitterness, allowing producers to move on the next steps, roasting and hulling. Roasting helps to develop the flavor of the beans, while shelling exposes the cacao nibs, the portion of the bean which has all the flavor.

Once cacao nibs are extracted, they must be ground into a substance known as Chocolate Liquor. Chocolate liquor isn't something you'd want to eat: it is extremely fatty, thanks to the cocoa butter it contains, and it is gritty and bitter. This liquid is then pressed to create what is known as press cake, a substance consisting primarily of cocoa solids, while the cocoa butter is allowed to drain away.

Once press cake has been created, producers have a number of options. To make cocoa, they can squeeze the press cake even more to isolate the cocoa solids before allowing it to dry and then pulverizing it. They can also blend some of the cocoa butter back in, along with sugar and other ingredients, to produce eating Chocolate, which is subjected to a process called conching to create a smooth, creamy confection without any traces of grittiness. Eating Chocolate can also be adulterated with milk, creating Milk Chocolate, and the level of sweetness can vary widely. For white chocolate, cocoa butter is mixed with Vanilla and milk.

The history of Chocolate is almost as interesting as the confection itself. In its native South America, Chocolate was prepared in drinks reserved for royalty and high ranking members of society. When European explorers visited, they were introduced to Chocolate, and upon bringing the food back to Europe, it became a big hit. Eventually, Europeans started exploring with their Chocolate, adding sugar and other ingredients and ultimately developing a process which would allow them to make bars in addition to Chocolate drinks. With the development of bar Chocolate, confectioners realized that Chocolate had a wide range of possibilities, from candy bar coating to truffles, and the once rare luxury turned into an extremely profitable global industry.



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Semi-Sweet Chocolate

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Semi-Sweet Chocolate


Semi-Sweet Chocolate ~ Easy Chocolate Cake
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Easy Chocolate Cake

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Semi-Sweet Chocolate

Semi-Sweet Chocolate is a kind of Chocolate that is often used for cooking and baking purposes. It is a Dark Chocolate with a low sugar content. In fact, semi-sweet chocolate usually has about half the amount of sugar as regular dark chocolate. Like dark chocolate, this less sweet version is made by adding sugar and fat to Cacao. Also, like dark chocolate, it is usually made without any milk added in although it may be made with some milk solids.

The United States Food and Drug administration has restrictions on what kinds of chocolate can be referred to as semi-sweet chocolate. semi-sweet chocolate and bittersweet or dark chocolate have the same regulations. They must have a makeup 35 percent or more of Chocolate Liquor and must have less than 12 percent milk solids. Some chefs and bakers contend that true semi-sweet chocolate should include no milk solids at all despite this rubric. In Britain, semisweet varieties of chocolate must contain 45 percent or more of chocolate liquor.

In some instances, the term semisweet is used interchangeably with the term bittersweet when referring to chocolate. Furthermore, both kinds of chocolate are often grouped together under the umbrella of dark chocolate. There is, however, a difference between the two. One of the key differences is the chocolate flavor. Bittersweet Chocolate usually has a more intense chocolate flavor than the semisweet variety.

Another main difference between these two types of chocolate is their level of sweetness. Semisweet varieties usually contain more sugar and are therefore sweeter than bittersweet varieties. As there is no regulation on the amount of sugar that is contained in these kinds of chocolates, the level of sweetness will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. In some cases, Bittersweet and Semi-Sweet varieties may be difficult to distinguish from one another, especially if they come from different manufacturers.

Sugar Free Chocolate, Baking Chocolate, Healthy Chocolate, Vegan Chocolate, Chocolate Ingredients, Christmas Chocolate, Chocolate Bark

This type of chocolate is often enjoyed on its own in the form of a candy or candy bar. It is also often used as a topping or even main ingredient in desserts. It is used in cupcakes, cookies, pastries, pies, cakes, and ice creams. It is also sometimes used in sorbets. Occasionally, semi-sweet chocolate chips will be added to muffins, which are served at breakfast. It is also sometimes used as an ingredient in mole sauce, which is a rich, savory sauce that is used in Mexican cooking to top poultry dishes.



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Bittersweet Chocolate

Easy Chocolate Cake

Bittersweet Chocolate


Bittersweet Chocolate ~ Easy Chocolate Cake
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Easy Chocolate Cake

Easy Chocolate Cake

Bittersweet Chocolate

Bittersweet Chocolate is a sweetened form of Dark Chocolate that does not contain milk in either liquid or dry form. Bittersweet chocolate is essentially a mixture of Chocolate Liquor, sugar, Cocoa butter, and sometimes Vanilla. Often, lecithin is added as an emulsifying agent. chocolate liquor, despite what its name seems to suggest, contains no alcohol. Rather, it is a form of cocoa produced by grinding cocoa beans down into liquid form. Solidified chocolate liquor formed into blocks is known as unsweetened baking chocolate.

In North America, Bittersweet chocolate is required, according to Standards of Identity established by the Food and Drug Administration, to contain a minimum of 35 percent chocolate liquor. In Great Britain, the figure is somewhat higher, rising to 43 percent. The more chocolate liquor the chocolate contains, the more intense its flavor will be. Especially high-quality Bittersweet chocolate may contain 65 to 70 percent, or more, of chocolate liquor.

Although the terms bittersweet and Semi-Sweet Chocolate are sometimes used interchangeably, there is a difference in the standards that define the two. Although not formally regulated across the industry, Bittersweet chocolate generally contains more chocolate liquor and less sugar than semi-sweet chocolate does. However, since semi-sweet chocolate can contain up to 35 percent liquor, the two chocolates can be very much alike. Bittersweet and semi-sweet chocolate can be used interchangeably in baking, with good results.

Both the semisweet and Bittersweet chocolates are occasionally labeled “couverture,” which designation indicates that the chocolate contains not less than 32 percent cocoa butter. Couverture must be tempered, a process that involves manipulating the temperature of the chocolate during the process of fat crystalization in its cocoa butter, before using. It is a favorite for dipping, coating, and molding. When melted, it is smooth and fluid, and when it hardens, it has a lovely sheen and a creamy texture.

Recent studies have revealed certain health benefits from the regular consumption of small quantities of Bittersweet chocolate. Due to its high cocoa content, dark chocolate is a good source of certain flavonoids — namely epicatechin and gallic acid — that may be protective for the heart.

Bittersweet chocolate also possesses antioxidant compounds and may also play a role in lowering blood pressure. It should be noted, however, that the flavonoids present in Bittersweet chocolate are destroyed by processing with alkali, as with Dutch-processed Cocoa Powder.

Bittersweet chocolate is available in several forms, including bars, chips, and chunks of various sizes. It is used in baking, cooking, and is eaten out of hand.

chocolate, including the bittersweet variety, is extremely sensitive to factors of temperature and humidity. The ideal—but relatively narrow—temperature window for storing chocolate is between 59 and 63 degrees F (15 and 17 degrees C), with a relative humidity at a finicky 50 percent or less. Conditions of varying temperature may cause changes in the appearance or texture of the chocolate, including a whitish “bloom” on the surface due to the presence of fat and/or sugar crystals there. Although the appearance of the chocolate may suffer, it is perfectly safe to eat.



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How to Taste Chocolate

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How to Taste Chocolate


How to Taste Chocolate ~ Easy Chocolate Cake
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Easy Chocolate Cake

Easy Chocolate Cake

How to Taste Chocolate

At the 2008 All Candy Expo I had the opportunity to attend a luncheon lecture from master chocolatier Jacques Torres, of Jacques Torres Chocolates. The lunch included Chocolate in every dish: the chicken was sauteed in a Bittersweet Chocolate sauce, the roast beef was brushed with Cocoa, the salad dressing had melted white chocolate, and of course the dessert was a rich chocolate brownie. (To see photos of the lunch and of Mr. Torres, click on the candy picture to the right.)

Mr. Torres began by talking about the elements that go into creating a “premium” confection. I probably would have guessed some of his criteria, like impeccable ingredients, technique, and craftsmanship, but he had other elements on his list that I hadn’t thought about, like technology, customization, instinct, and imbuing your candy brand with a compelling story. He also shared anecdotes about opening his New York stores, and showed how it was possible to accomplish big things with a small amount of money and lots of hard work. Finally, we were provided with three Chocolates and Mr. Torres led us through a guided tasting, showing us what to look for in quality Chocolates.

Mr. Torres had us begin by looking at the chocolate: is it shiny or dull? Chocolate that is well-made and properly tempered has a nice sheen. When you rub your finger across the chocolate, how does it feel? Chocolate that has “bloomed,” or lost its temper, will feel grainy when you rub it, while Tempered Chocolate will feel smooth and satiny.

Next, we were instructed to smell the chocolate. Fresh chocolate will have a gorgeous chocolate odor, while older Chocolate will not smell as potent. Mr. Torres also told us that there is a palpable difference in smell between different Dark Chocolate-Semi-Sweet Chocolate (around 60% Cacao) smell much more mild than Chocolates in the 70-80% range, which have a more acidic fragrance. Since we only had one Dark Chocolate in our assortment I couldn’t test this theory, but while I have no doubt Mr. Torres can tell the difference between the Chocolates by smell, I’m not so confident that my nose could do the same.

Finally, we were allowed to Taste The Chocolate. The three Chocolates we tasted were a milk chocolate heart with passion fruit ganache, a Milk Chocolate square with a cinnamon praline filling, and a Dark Chocolate square with an Earl Grey tea ganache. We started with the passion fruit heart, which was incredible. The ganache was silky smooth and intensely Flavored. Passion fruit has a lot of citric acid, so the flavor was very fruity and very tart, causing my mouth to water even after the candy was gone. The passion fruit was the first flavor note to hit, then after a few seconds the smooth, Sweet Milk Chocolate came through and, in Mr. Torres’ words, “calmed down” the passion fruit.

After the candy has been swallowed, the flavor quickly leaves the mouth, which is another sign of a well-Made Chocolate. The smooth texture, or what is often called mouthfeel, signifies the quality of the Chocolate. If the candy was cheaper and did not have enough cocoa butter, or replaced some of the cocoa butter with other inferior fats, the texture might be grainy and the feel of the fats might coat the mouth long after the Chocolate has Melted. Additionally, if the taste of the filling lingers long after the candy is gone, this means that artificial flavoring or essential oils were used. If the filling flavor disappears quickly, you can be reasonably sure that natural flavorings, like fruit purees, were used instead. Mr. Torres uses only natural flavorings, so it was a wonder to find that the incredibly intense passion fruit flavor was gone soon after the candy was swallowed.

The final two Chocolates demonstrated Mr. Torres’ mastery of harnessing disparate flavors and coaxing them together into unexpectedly delicious combinations. The Milk Chocolate square featured two different layers: a hazelnut praline on bottom, and a cinnamon ganache on top, made from cream infused with cinnamon sticks as opposed to ground cinnamon. The first sensation you feel when biting into this candy is a slight grain from the sugary praline, then a strong cinnamon note comes through, nicely complimenting the toasted hazelnut flavor. The cinnamon “hits you on the nose,” in Mr. Torres’ description, but quickly disappears once the Chocolate is gone. This Chocolate was quite addictive and my favorite of the three we tried.

The Dark Chocolate square had a Dark Chocolate ganache inside infused with real Earl Grey tea. Unlike other tea Chocolates I’ve tried, the Earl Grey flavor was strong, true, and unmistakable. The flavor took a little more time to develop, as is the case with many tea products, and it lingered longer on the palate. The Dark Chocolate was a good match for the savory, smoky tea, and although I am not the biggest fan of tea, I appreciated this Chocolate for the depth of flavor and obvious quality of the Chocolate used. At the end of the chocolate tasting I felt as if I had a new understanding of how to approach and analyze Chocolates, and I can’t wait to apply these techniques to other Chocolates I encounter.



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Milk Chocolate

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Milk Chocolate


Milk Chocolate ~ Easy Chocolate Cake
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Easy Chocolate Cake

Easy Chocolate Cake

Milk Chocolate

In addition to containing cocoa solids, Milk Chocolate contains either condensed milk (most European varieties) or dry milk solids. Milk Chocolates are typically much sweeter than Dark Chocolate, and many popular candy bars that are Chocolate-based use Milk Chocolate.

Milk Chocolate is the combination of Chocolate Liquor, cocoa butter, Vanilla, milk solids, and lecithin. This Type Of Chocolate could be kept up to a year if stored in a cool, dry place. Milk Chocolate must contain at least 10% of chocolate liquor, 3.7% milk fats, and 12% milk solids. The U.S. Government requires a 10% concentration of chocolate liquor while EU regulations specify a minimum of 25% chocolate liquor. This makes European Milk Chocolate better than American Milk Chocolate, because the more chocolate liquor added the more delicious it gets. Generally, Milk Chocolate is popularly used in decorating cake and cookies.

Milk Chocolate is solid chocolate made with milk in the form of milk powder, liquid milk, or condensed milk (invented by Henri Nestle in the 1800s) added. In the 1870s Swiss confectioner Daniel Peter had developed solid Milk Chocolate using condensed milk; hitherto it had only been available as a drink. The U.S. Government requires a 10% concentration of chocolate liquor. EU regulations specify a minimum of 25% cocoa solids, however an agreement was reached in 2003 that allows Milk Chocolate in the UK and Ireland to contain only 20% cocoa solids. This type of chocolate must be called "family Milk Chocolate" elsewhere in the European Union.



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Dark Chocolate

Easy Chocolate Cake

Dark Chocolate


Dark Chocolate ~ Easy Chocolate Cake
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Easy Chocolate Cake

Easy Chocolate Cake

Dark Chocolate

Dark Chocolate is Chocolate without milk solids added. Dark chocolate has a more pronounced chocolate taste than Milk Chocolate, because it does not contain milk solids to compete with the Chocolate Taste. However, the lack of milk additives also means that Dark chocolate is more prone to a dry, chalky texture and a bitter aftertaste.

The basic ingredients in Dark chocolate bars are Cacao beans, sugar, an emulsifier such as soy lecithin to preserve texture, and flavorings such as Vanilla. Dark chocolate is often distinguished by the percentage of cocoa solids in the bar. The Cocoa content of commercial Dark chocolate bars can range from 30% (sweet dark) to 70%, 75%, or even above 80% for extremely dark bars. Common terms used to distinguish the cocoa content of Dark chocolate bars include bittersweet, semi-sweet Chocolate, and sweet dark chocolate.
Also Known As: Bittersweet Chocolate, Semi-Sweet Chocolate, Sweet Dark Chocolate



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How to Make Toffee

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How to Make Toffee


How to Make Toffee ~ Easy Chocolate Cake
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Easy Chocolate Cake

Easy Chocolate Cake

How to Make Toffee

Assemble Your Ingredients
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Easy Chocolate Cake


This classic Toffee is buttery and rich, and pairs very well with Dark Chocolate. For easily printable instructions, please refer to the English Toffee Recipe.

Begin by assembling your ingredients:

* 3/4 cup almonds, toasted and Choped
* 1 pound of dark chocolate
* 2 cups (1 pound) butter
* 2-2/3 cups granulated sugar
* 1/3 cup water
* 1/4 cup light corn Syrup

You will also need a large baking sheet with 1" sides, covered with foil and sprayed with nonstick cooking spray.




Combine Ingredients in a Large Saucepan
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Easy Chocolate Cake


Cut the butter into small, even squares. Place the chopped butter, sugar, water, and corn syrup in a large heavy saucepan over medium heat.




Stir Until Melted
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Easy Chocolate Cake


Stir the mixture constantly until the sugar is dissolved and the butter is melted. Insert a candy thermometer and bring the candy to a boil. Periodically brush down the sides of the pan with a wet pastry brush to prevent sugar crystals from forming on the sides and turning your candy unpleasantly gritty.




Cook Until 300 Degrees
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Easy Chocolate Cake


Continue to cook the candy, stirring frequently, until it reaches 300 degrees on the candy thermometer. If the candy appears to separate (with a layer of melted butter on top) carefully stir it vigorously to make it come back together again. Watch the candy as it approaches 300, since it cooks quickly and can easily scorch at high temperatures. As it reaches the proper temperature it will turn a dark, golden amber color.




Pour the Toffee Onto the Prepared Pan
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Easy Chocolate Cake


Once the candy reaches 300 degrees, carefully remove the pan from heat and pour the toffee onto the prepared baking sheet. Do not scrape out the remaining candy clinging to the sides and bottom of the pan. Be very careful during this process, as hot sugar can cause painful burns.




Spread and Score the Toffee
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Easy Chocolate Cake


1. Immediately after the toffee is poured onto the baking sheet, use a spatula to spread the candy to an even thickness.

2. Allow the toffee to begin to set for a minute or two, then spray a knife with nonstick cooking spray and score the toffee into small squares or rectangles, firmly cutting through to the bottom of the pan. Allow the toffee to cool completely.




Break the Toffee into Pieces
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Easy Chocolate Cake

Once the toffee is cool, carefully break it apart on the scored lines into small squares. At this point, the toffee is finished and can be served plain. If you wish to dip it in chocolate, proceed to the next step.




Dip the Toffee in Chocolate
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Easy Chocolate Cake


To dip the toffee in chocolate, begin by Melting Chocolate. Place it in a microwave-safe bowl and microwave it in one-minute increments, stirring after every minute to prevent Overheating.

Dip each piece of toffee in the chocolate. You can dip it halfway in, or if you prefer, you can use a fork or dipping tools to submerge the toffee pieces entirely in chocolate. Remove the toffee from the chocolate and drag the bottom of the fork across the lip of the bowl to remove excess chocolate. Place dipped toffee pieces on a baking sheet lined with aluminum foil. You can serve the Chocolate Dipped toffee as-is, or if you would like to cover it with chopped nuts, proceed to the next step.



Sprinkle the Toffee With Nuts
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Easy Chocolate Cake


While the chocolate is still wet, sprinkle the tops of the toffee bars generously with chopped nuts. Repeat with the remaining chocolate, toffee and nuts.





Finishing Touches
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Easy Chocolate Cake


Place the toffee in the refrigerator to set the chocolate for about 20-30 minutes. Once the chocolate is set, the toffee can be served immediately or stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to one week.



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English Toffee Recipe

Easy Chocolate Cake

English Toffee Recipe


English Toffee ~ Easy Chocolate Cake
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Easy Chocolate Cake

Easy Chocolate Cake

English Toffee Recipe

English Toffee

This classic Toffee is buttery and rich, and pairs very well with dark chocolate. Do not substitute margarine for the butter—you will sacrifice essential flavor. Be sure to check out the photo guide with step-by-step instructions showing how to Make Toffee.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes


Ingredients

* 3/4 cup almonds
* 1 pound of dark chocolate
* 2 cups (1 pound) butter
* 2-2/3 cups granulated sugar
* 1/3 cup water
* 1/4 cup light corn syrup


Preparation

1. Toast the nuts by spreading them on a cookie sheet and placing them in a 325-degree oven for approximately 10 minutes. Stir them every 3-4 minutes, and remove them once they darken and become fragrant. Let the nuts cool, then chop them finely.

2. Prepare a 12x16 inch cookie sheet by lining it with aluminum foil and spraying it with nonstick cooking spray.

3. Combine the butter, sugar, water and corn syrup in a large heavy saucepan over medium heat. Stir constantly to dissolve the sugar and melt the butter. Insert a candy thermometer and bring the candy to a boil, periodically brushing down the sides with a wet pastry brush to prevent crystallization.

4. Continue to cook the candy, stirring frequently, until it reaches 300 degrees. If the candy appears to separate (with a layer of melted butter on top) stir vigorously to make it come back together again. Watch the candy as it approaches 300, since it cooks quickly and can scorch at high temperatures.

5. Once the candy reaches 300 degrees, remove from heat and pour it onto the prepared baking sheet. Use a spatula or spoon to spread the candy to an even thickness. Allow the toffee to begin to set, then spray a knife with nonstick cooking spray and score the toffee into small squares or rectangles. Allow the toffee to cool completely.

6. Once the toffee is cool, break it apart on the scored lines into small squares. The toffee can be left plain, or dipped in chocolate.

7. To dip the toffee in chocolate, begin by melting the chocolate. Place it in a microwave-safe bowl and microwave it in one-minute increments, stirring after every minute to prevent overheating.

8. Dip each piece of toffee in the chocolate, either submerging it completely or dipping it halfway in, according to your preference. Place dipped toffee pieces on a baking sheet lined with aluminum foil. While the chocolate is still wet, sprinkle the top generously with chopped nuts. Repeat with remaining toffee, chocolate and nuts.

9. Place the toffee in the refrigerator to set the chocolate, about 30 minutes. Once set, toffee can be served immediately or stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to one week.



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Toffee-Topped Fudge Recipe

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Toffee-Topped Fudge Recipe


Toffee-Topped Fudge ~ Easy Chocolate Cake
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Easy Chocolate Cake

Easy Chocolate Cake

Toffee-Topped Fudge Recipe

Toffee-Topped Fudge

Toffee-Topped Fudge combines two classic favorites into one great candy. A smooth, tangy fudge is topped with crunchy, sweet toffee, and both flavors benefit from the pairing. You can use almost any kind of toffee for this recipe: homemade, purchased toffee bits, or chopped toffee bars (regular or chocolate-covered).


Ingredients

* 6 oz unsweetened chocolate
* 8 oz cream cheese, softened to room temperature
* 4 cups (1 lb) powdered sugar
* 2 tsp Vanilla extract
* 1/2 tsp salt
* 1 cup toffee bits or chopped toffee bars


Preparation

1. Prepare a 9x9 pan by lining it with aluminum foil and spraying the foil with nonstick cooking spray.

2. Chop the unsweetened chocolate and place it in a microwave-safe bowl. Microwave it until melted, stirring after every 30 seconds to prevent overheating.

3. Meanwhile, place the room temperature cream cheese in the bowl of a large stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. (Alternately, you could use a large bowl and a hand mixer.) Beat the cream cheese until it is creamy and smooth.

4. Once the chocolate is melted, pour it into the cream cheese and beat until combined. Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides. Add the powdered sugar, vanilla, and salt, and start the mixer on low. Once all the sugar is mixed in, stop the mixer again and scrape it down, and run it once more until all ingredients are well-incorporated and there are no dry patches.

5. Scrape the fudge into the prepared pan and smooth it into an even layer. Scatter the toffee in a thick layer on top and press it firmly into the fudge.

6. Refrigerate the fudge to set it, about 90 minutes. Once set, remove the fudge from the pan using the foil as handles. Cut it into small one-inch pieces to serve. For optimal taste and texture, serve this fudge at room temperature. It will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week, but after several days the toffee will start to get soft and sticky, so I recommend eating it before then!



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Toffee Recipe

Easy Chocolate Cake

Toffee Recipe


Toffee Recipes ~ Easy Chocolate Cake
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Easy Chocolate Cake

Easy Chocolate Cake

Toffee Recipes

Toffee Recipe of all types, including many chocolate and nut variations.


Toffee-Topped Fudge

Toffee-Topped Fudge combines two classic favorites into one great candy. A smooth, tangy fudge is topped with crunchy, sweet toffee, and both flavors benefit from the pairing.


Toffee Candy Recipe Index

Here you will find an index of all toffee candy recipes.


How to Make Toffee

This photo guide will show you how to make a classic toffee recipe using step-by-step photo illustrations.


What is Toffee?

The definition of toffee Guide to Candy.


Hazelnut Toffee

Hazelnut Toffee features roasted hazelnuts in a buttery, crunchy toffee drizzled with sweet milk chocolate.


Walnut Brittle

This Walnut Brittle recipe had loads of crunchy nuts the deep, rich taste of caramelized sugar and molasses.


Maple Pecan Brittle

Maple Pecan Brittle is a buttery toffee with a robust maple flavor and a nice crunch from toasted pecans.


Cashew White Chocolate Toffee

Cashew White Chocolate Toffee has a deep, dark burnt sugar taste that complements the salty cashews and sweet white chocolate.


Corn Chip Toffee

Corn Chip Toffee is the perfect candy for a snack attack. Crunchy, salty corn chips are mixed with peanut butter chips and covered with a sweet, crispy toffee layer, then slathered with semi-sweet chocolate and topped with peanuts.


Butterscotch Cracker Brittle

Butterscotch Cracker Brittle is an easy oven brittle that uses graham crackers, butterscotch hard candies, and semi-sweet chocolate chips.


Coffee Toffee Bark

Robust coffee, creamy white chocolate, and buttery toffee combine in this Coffee Toffee Bark to create a rich candy perfectly suited to adult taste buds.


S'mores Toffee Bark

S’mores Toffee Bark features graham crackers covered with a simple toffee, smothered in chocolate and topped with marshmallows. The classic s’mores flavors get a boost from crunchy, buttery toffee.


Banana Cashew Toffee

Banana Cashew Toffee features the sweet taste of bananas and the crunch of salted cashews in a rich toffee base.


Macadamia Nut Brittle

Macadamia Nut Brittle is a sweet, crispy brittle loaded with chunks of rich, salty macadamia nuts.


Saltine Toffee

This easy Saltine Toffee recipe uses saltine crackers and a few common ingredients to make an uncommonly good candy that’s sweet, salty, crunchy, and chocolatey.


German Chocolate Toffee

The classic German chocolate flavors of coconut and toasted pecans are paired with sweet dark chocolate in this rich, buttery toffee.


Peanut Honey Toffee

This toffee recipe, featuring honey, peanut butter, and whole peanuts, is a delicious twist on an old favorite.


Cinnamon Hazelnut Toffee

This rich, buttery toffee is studded with toasted hazelnut and scented with cinnamon, then topped with semi-sweet chocolate.


Chocolate Toffee Bars

Chocolate Toffee Bars combine the best of both worlds: crunchy, sweet toffee and smooth, bittersweet chocolate.


Peanut Butter Toffee

Peanut Butter is the not-so-secret ingredient in this nutty, crunchy toffee recipe.


Dark Toffee

Brown sugar and molasses give this special toffee recipe a deep, dark taste.


Buttery Nut Toffee

This recipe for Buttery Nut Toffee produces a rich, dark toffee studded with crunchy nuts. An optional dipping of melted chocolate adds a smooth, sweet finishing touch.


Almond Toffee

This almond toffee is the ultimate in decadence! Rich and buttery, it is sandwiched between two chocolate layers and is brimming with toasted almond flavor.


Peanut Brittle

Peanut brittle is a classic with a crunchy texture and rich, nutty taste.


Almond Roca

Homemade Almond Roca candy is even better than the storebought version! This combination of roasted almonds, crunchy toffee and semisweet chocolate is a winner.


Traditional Toffee

This is toffee like Grandma used to make!


English Toffee

This classic toffee is buttery and rich, and pairs very well with dark chocolate.


Sesame Toffee

Sesame seeds and chocolate enliven this unusual buttery toffee.


Old-Fashioned Butterscotch

Buttery, creamy, sweet and delicious, butterscotch is an old-fashioned favorite.



Related : By Elizabeth LaBau, About.com Guide ~ Toffee Recipes, Easy Chocolate Cake
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How to Dip Truffles

Easy Chocolate Cake

How to Dip Truffles


How to Dip Truffles ~ Easy Chocolate Cake
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Easy Chocolate Cake

Easy Chocolate Cake

How to Dip Truffles

Dipping Truffles and other soft centers in a coating of chocolate adds a beautiful, delicious finishing touch to many candies. The chocolate imparts a good flavor while also adding a protective coating, and dipping candy centers is easy if you follow these basic instructions.

1. Choose Your Chocolate

The big question is, Chocolate or chocolate coating? Both options have pros and cons: chocolate tastes better but tempering takes time and can be tricky, whereas chocolate coating has an inferior taste but is fast and easy to work with.

In any case, use the best product you can afford. For chocolate coating, I recommend Felchin Ultra Gloss Dark Chocolate and for real chocolate, I recommend any high-quality chocolate that you enjoy eating on its own. After all, you will be imparting this flavor to all of your dipped candies! If you are using real chocolate, skip step 2, and if you are using chocolate coating skip step 3.

2. Melt the Chocolate Coating

First, the chocolate will need to be Choped Chocolate in order to melt evenly. Some brands of chocolate and chocolate coating can be purchased in wafer sizes or bite-sized bars that don't require chopping. However, if you buy large bars of chocolate or bulk chocolate coating, you will need to chop it before Melting Chocolate, so that it will melt at an even rate and not Overheated Chocolate.

Place the chopped coating chocolate in a large microwave-safe bowl, microwave it at half-power (if your microwave has this feature) and stir after every minute. Stop heating when most of the coating is melted, and stir constantly until the remaining chunks of coating have melted and the mixture is smooth and even.

3. Temper the Chocolate

For professional-looking dipped candies, your chocolate should be tempered. Chocolate that has been tempered is smooth, with a shiny finish and a satisfying snap. Tempering Chocolate is not a difficult process, but it can take time and require a few pieces of specialized equipment. For tempering instructions, read how to temper chocolate, or watch a video showing how to temper chocolate.

Note that if you are pressed for time you can simply melt your chocolate with a small amount of shortening to thin it, but the resulting candies will have to remain refrigerated or they will begin to melt at room temperature.

4. Prepare Your Workstation

It is best to have everything ready before you begin dipping. Place your bowl of chocolate at your clean workstation and set out your dipping tools or dinner forks. Cover a baking sheet with a clean piece of parchment or aluminum foil for placing the finished candies on. Keep your truffles or soft fillings in the refrigerator until right before you are ready to use them.

5. Dip the Centers in the Prepared Chocolate

Slide the edge of your fork or dipping tool under the truffle or candy center, and lift it up gently. Drop the truffle into the melted chocolate and push it just under the surface of the chocolate. Lift it out of the chocolate with the fork, and tap the fork several times against the side of the bowl. Slide the bottom of the fork over the lip of the bowl to remove excess chocolate from the bottom of the candy. Place the fork over the prepared baking sheet, and tilt the fork so the edge of the truffle touches the sheet. Smoothly slide the fork out from under the truffle. If you are adding decorations or garnishes to your candies, do it now, when the chocolate is still wet. Repeat the process with the remaining centers and chocolate.

6. Allow the Chocolate to Set

If the temperature of your room is moderately cool (60 to 70 degrees) your candies can be left out to set, but if your room is warm, or you want to speed up the process, you can refrigerate them for approximately 30 minutes to set the chocolate. The exception is untempered chocolate, which should always be refrigerated after dipping.

7. Trim and Store the Candies

Once the chocolate has set, you might notice a small pool of chocolate forming "feet" at the bottom of your truffles. If desired, you can trim them with a small sharp paring knife. Wear gloves to avoid getting fingerprints on your candies, and place them on a flat surface. Grip the candy in one hand, and use the paring knife to press down on the excess chocolate and cut it off in short clean strokes. Trimming the candies is purely an aesthetic decision, and you can certainly skip this step if desired. Store the candies in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.



Related : By Elizabeth LaBau, About.com Guide ~ How to Dip Truffles, Easy Chocolate Cake
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How to Make Truffles

Easy Chocolate Cake

How to Make Truffles


Easy Chocolate Cake
Picture Of

Easy Chocolate Cake

Easy Chocolate Cake

How to Make Truffles


How to Make Truffles
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Easy Chocolate Cake


It doesn't get any simpler--or more delicious--than this. Dark chocolate and cream come together to form divine, melt-in-your-mouth dark chocolate truffles. For best results, use good-quality dark chocolate. For easily printable instructions, please see the Dark Chocolate Truffles recipe. Begin by assembling your ingredients:

* 9 ounces bittersweet chocolate (about 1.5 cups chopped)
* 2/3 cup heavy cream
* 1 tsp Vanilla extract
* 1/2 cup Cocoa Powder
* Baking sheet lined with aluminum foil
* Small saucepan

Note also that these candies, like most truffles, require an extensive chilling period, so be sure to leave enough time when making them.


Chop the Chocolate
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Easy Chocolate Cake


To Chop Chocolate, use a sharp, heavy chef’s knife (a large straight-bladed knife, usually 8-10 inches) and press down firmly and evenly on the chocolate, beginning with the corners and angling the knife slightly outward. Whittle the chocolate gradually, working from the corners, until the chocolate is chopped into small, even pieces. Place the chopped chocolate in a large heat-safe bowl.


Simmer the Cream
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Easy Chocolate Cake


Place the cream in a small saucepan and scald it until bubbles being to appear around the sides of the pan. Watch it carefully, as you do not want it to reach a full boil.


Pour the Cream on the Chocolate
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Easy Chocolate Cake


Carefully pour the cream over the chopped chocolate in the bowl. Allow the cream and chocolate to sit for one minute to soften and Melt Chocolate.


Whisk the Chocolate
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Easy Chocolate Cake


1. Using a whisk, gently stir to incorporate the cream and chocolate. At first the mixture will look muddy and messy, but continue to whisk smoothly.

2. Soon the chocolate and cream will come together and have a homogeneous texture. This chocolate-cream mixture is called "ganache." In addition to making truffles, ganache can be used to frost cakes or glaze baked goods. Once your mixture is smooth, add the vanilla and stir until it is well-combined, but do not stir too vigorously or you will incorporate air bubbles.


Cover and Chill the Ganache
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Easy Chocolate Cake


Cover the truffle mixture with cling wrap and allow it to cool to room temperature. Once cool, refrigerate until it is firm enough to spoon, about 1-2 hours depending on your refrigerator and on the chocolate you used. While you are waiting for the ganache to chill, place the cocoa powder in a shallow pie tin or plate.


Scoop Out Balls of Ganache
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Easy Chocolate Cake


There are many different methods of forming truffles. Two of the most common include piping the soft ganache into small mounds, then rolling them into balls, or scooping hardened ganache into small balls and rolling it. The method illustrated here is one of the easiest and fastest ways to form truffles, but be warned--it does get your hands messy!

1. Using a small spoon, scoop out a walnut-sized ball of ganache from the bowl. The texture of the ganache should be firm enough to scoop, but still a bit soft and not entirely hard. It should form a ball in the bowl of the spoon fairly easily and not crumble or break apart.

2. Drop the ball of ganache into the mound of cocoa powder in the pie tin, and stir it around so it is covered with cocoa powder. You can do one truffle at a time, or make several balls at a time.


Roll the Truffles by Hand
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Easy Chocolate Cake


Now that the ganache balls are roughly formed, it's time to make them round. Dust your hands with cocoa powder and pick up a cocoa-covered ganache ball. Gently roll it between your palms until it is round, then place it on the foil-lined baking sheet. Because the ball is already covered with cocoa powder and is fairly firm, it should be easy to shape and not stick to your palms very much. Repeat with remaining ganache and Cocoa Powder. If at any time the ganache becomes too soft to work with, place it in the refrigerator to chill for a few minutes.


Finishing Touches
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Easy Chocolate Cake


Once rolled, your truffles are ready to eat! For best flavor and texture, they should be eaten at room temperature. If you are not going to serve them right away, place them in an airtight container in the refrigerator, but bring them to room temperature before serving. You can store truffles in the refrigerator for up to one week.

Note that truffles are traditionally served with a coating of cocoa powder, but you can experiment by rolling them in toasted nuts, coconut, powdered sugar, or any other coatings you can dream up. Truffles can also be Dipped Chocolate if you desire.



Related : By Elizabeth LaBau, About.com Guide ~ How to Make Truffles, Easy Chocolate Cake
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